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May 202017
 

I just love messing around with run-time languages that I know relatively little about (and if your sarcasm detector isn’t flashing red about now, take it out and give it a good talking to).

The problem detailed here is something that you are unlikely to encounter unless you get into weird stuff like running an odd-ball window manager, aren’t content with the version of said window manager distributed with your Linux distribution, and are used to re-compiling things from scratch.

It all started when I upgraded Ubuntu on my work machine (to Zesty Zapus). The window manager version was upgraded from 3.5 to 4.0, which broke on my configuration file (3.5); not a big problem I thought, as I had already upgraded my window manager at home to 4.1 and reconfigured the configuration file. I copied the updated configuration file from home into place.

And it failed. Apparently I use 4.1-isms within the file. As I was not happy about tinkering with the file to downgrade it (in a language I know relatively little about), I decided to re-compile Awesome 4.1 instead.

Which failed with a weird error :-

» awesome --version
awesome v4.1 (Technologic)
 • Compiled against Lua 5.3.3 (running with Lua 5.3)
 • D-Bus support: ✔
 • execinfo support: ✔
 • xcb-randr version: 1.4
 • LGI version: [string "return require('lgi.version')"]:1: module 'lgi.version' not found:
	no field package.preload['lgi.version']
	no file '/usr/local/share/lua/5.3/lgi/version.lua'
	no file '/usr/local/share/lua/5.2/lgi/version.lua'
	no file '/usr/local/share/lua/5.3/lgi/version/init.lua'
	no file '/usr/local/share/lua/5.2/lgi/version/init.lua'
	no file '/usr/local/lib/lua/5.3/lgi/version.lua'
	no file '/usr/local/lib/lua/5.3/lgi/version/init.lua'
	no file '/usr/share/lua/5.3/lgi/version.lua'
	no file '/usr/share/lua/5.3/lgi/version/init.lua'
	no file './lgi/version.lua'
	no file './lgi/version/init.lua'
	no file '/usr/local/lib/lua/5.3/lgi/version.so'
	no file '/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/lua/5.3/lgi/version.so'
	no file '/usr/lib/lua/5.3/lgi/version.so'
	no file '/usr/local/lib/lua/5.3/loadall.so'
	no file './lgi/version.so'
	no file '/usr/local/lib/lua/5.3/lgi.so'
	no file '/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/lua/5.3/lgi.so'
	no file '/usr/lib/lua/5.3/lgi.so'
	no file '/usr/local/lib/lua/5.3/loadall.so'
	no file './lgi.so'

Which had me stumped for a while, and it turns out that DuckDuckGo didn’t have an obvious fix (one of the reasons for writing this).

Eventually I figured out that awesome was not finding the LGI module (I can be slow at times) which was odd because it was definitely installed. However it turns out that it was installed in /usr/share/lua/5.2/lgi. So despite having lua 5.3 installed, extra lua modules can only be seen if you have lua 5.2 installed?

The “fix” for this was to create an environment variable telling LUA to search for files in rather more places before starting Awesome :-

export LUA_PATH="/usr/local/share/lua/5.3/?.lua;/usr/local/share/lua/5.2/?.lua;/usr/local/share/lua/5.3/?/init.lua;/usr/local/share/lua/5.2/?/init.lua;/usr/local/lib/lua/5.3/?.lua;/usr/local/lib/lua/5.3/?/init.lua;/usr/share/lua/5.3/?.lua;/usr/share/lua/5.2/?.lua;/usr/share/lua/5.3/?/init.lua;/usr/share/lua/5.2/?/init.lua;./?.lua;./?/init.lua"

This was created by running lua from the command line and running print(package.path) to display the default setting, and adding the 5.2 equivalent for many elements.

As to whether it works or not, well I cannot be sure (I’m not going into work on a weekend just to check if the window manager fires up), but Awesome itself seems happy with the result :-

» awesome --version
awesome v4.1 (Technologic)
 • Compiled against Lua 5.3.3 (running with Lua 5.3)
 • D-Bus support: ✔
 • execinfo support: ✔
 • xcb-randr version: 1.4
 • LGI version: 0.9.1

So it can find LGI, but whether it can do anything useful with it remains to be seen!

Apr 302017
 

Despite how long I have been running Windows in virtual machines (as far back as Vmware Workstation 1.0), I have never gotten around to looking at the virtio network interface – except for naïvely turning it on once, finding it didn’t work, and turning it off – so I decided to have a look at it. I was prompted to do this by a suggestion that emulating the NIC hardware as opposed to simply using a virtual communications channel to the host would hurt network performance. Good job I chose a long weekend because I ran into a few issues :-

  • Getting appropriate test tools took a while because most of the tools I know of are very old; I ended up using iperf2 on both the Linux main host and the Windows 10 guest (within the “Windows
  • The “stable” virtio drivers (also called “NetKVM”) drivers didn’t work. Specifically they could send packets but not receive them (judging from the DORA conversation that was more of a DODO). I installed the “latest” drivers from https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Windows_Virtio_Drivers. Note to late readers: this was as of 2017-04-30; different versions may offer different results.
  • Upgrading my ancient Debian Jessie kernel to 4.9 on the off-chance it was a kernel bug turned into a bit of an exercise what with ZFS disappearing after the upgrade, and sorting out the package dependencies to get it re-installed was “interesting” (for small values of course). No data loss though.

I ran two tests :-

  1. sudo nping –tcp -p 445 –count 200 –data-len 1280 ${ip of windows guest) – to judge how reliable the network connection was.
  2. On the Linux host: sudo iperf -p 50001 
  3. On the Windows guest (from within the Ubuntu-based environment): sudo iperf -p 50001 -c ${ip of Linux host}
Device nping result iperf result
Windows guest (virtual Intel Pro 1000 MT Desktop 1 lost 416 Mbits/sec
Windows guest (virtio) 0 lost 164 Mbits/sec
CuBox running ARM Linux n/a 425 Mbits/sec

Which is not the result I was expecting. And yes I did repeat the tests a number of times (I’ve cheated and chosen the best numbers for the above table), and no I did not confuse which NIC was configured at the time of the tests nor did I get the tests mixed up. And to those who claim that the use of the Ubuntu environment screwed things up, that appears not to be the case – I repeated the test with a Windows compiled version of iperf with much the same results.

So it seems despite common sense indicating that a NIC “hardware” custom designed for a virtual environment should perform better than an emulation of a hardware NIC, the actual result in this case was the other way around. Except for the nping result which shows the loss of a single packet with the emulated hardware NIC.

Apr 032017
 

Since getting a HiDPI screen, I have been plagued with claws mail merrily doing the right thing with proper emails, but showing HTML emails at a tiny size.

Whilst it doesn’t appear to be a preference you can change in the normal way, there is a zoom variable you can change within the Claws preferences file. Quit claws, and edit ~/.claws-mail/.clawsrc and scroll down through the file until you find the “[Fancy]” section :-

[fancy]
enable_images=1
enable_remote_content=1
enable_scripts=0
enable_plugins=0
open_external=1
zoom_level=100
enable_java=0
enable_proxy=0

Change the “zoom_level” to a suitable percentage (such as 200).

Feb 122017
 

A very long time ago, I used to collect spam in order to graph how much spam a single mail server was likely to get over time, and almost as long ago, I lost interest in maintaining it. As a consequence I still get a ton of spam every day and after a long period of procrastination I have been slowly raising defences against spam.

This particular recipe is not really a defence against spam – it verifies that the remote server is properly DNS registered with a reverse DNS registration – in other words that the IP address it is connecting from is registered. This is a requirement for all mail servers, and as it turns out, spammers don’t care for registering their servers in the DNS.

This ACL snippet goes into the ACL for checking the recipient or for checking the message :-

 deny
   message = Your mail server is not properly DNS registered
   log_message = BLOCKED: No rDNS
   condition = ${if eq{$host_lookup_failed} {1} {1}{0}}
   # Check rDNS and block if not registered

There are three items of interest :-

  1. The message is intended to be easily read by recipients to determine what the problem is. It turns out that many people do not read NDRs, but if we get the message right at least we are doing the right thing.
  2. The log_message is intended to make automating log parsing easier.
  3. Within the condition, the $host_lookup_failed variable indicates that the reverse DNS lookup returned NXDOMAIN and not that it timed out (which would be $host_lookup_deferred).

That’s all there is to this little piece of configuration.

Jan 052016
 

A bit of a simple one this … if you are looking at converting an Intel hex format file that looks like the following :-

2016-01-05_2123

Then it is relatively trivial under Linux (Debian). The relevant tool is probably installed anyway; unless you are not compiling software which may be a marginal activity for weird people but so is converting ihex files. But just in case, you can install it with: sudo apt-get install binutils.

Once installed (or being already present) the conversion process is as simple as :-

» objcopy -I ihex -O binary somefile.hex somefile.bin

Be careful to specify the second file name or objcopy will overwrite the original hex file (don’t ask how I discovered this!).

Dec 102015
 

damascus-unix-prompt

You have a a column of numbers that you have produced in some manner such as :-

$ awk '/clean message/ {print $(NF-1)}' mail.info.log
...
100935
12197
3606
84653
4498
99110
4762
3001
10889
12611
12249
12245
136599
49097
6668

And you want a quick and dirty way of finding the largest number. Well there is a way but it is perhaps the least efficient way to do it, and that is to sort the numbers into numerical order and use “head” to display the first one :-

$ awk '/clean message/ {print $(NF-1)}' mail.info.log | sort -rn | head -1
5476168

But frankly there must be a better method. And yes there is if you happen to be using zsh (or possibly others, but this has been tested with zsh). Simply iterate over the values assigning the current value to the “max” variable if the current variable is larger :-

$ max=0; for x in $(awk '/clean message/ {print $(NF-1)}' mail.info.log); [[ $x -gt $max ]] && max=$x; echo $max
5476168

You may be wondering why I don’t simply use the ability of awk to perform calculations. Well that is certainly possible, but I may not always be using awk to produce the numbers in the first place, and this is supposed to be a generic recipe.

Nov 142015
 

I am obviously doing something wrong because computers are not supposed to behave like this, but my Linux containers (despite previous attempts) are booting with IPv6 privacy addresses randomly :-

✓ root@pica» lxc-ls --fancy | grep chagers
chagers   RUNNING  10.0.0.32  2001:8b0:ca2c:dead::5e11, 2001:8b0:ca2c:dead:f42b:6dff:fe16:2f2d  YES        
✓ root@pica» lxc-stop --name chagers; lxc-start --daemon --name chagers
✓ root@pica» lxc-ls --fancy | grep chagers
chagers   RUNNING  10.0.0.32  2001:8b0:ca2c:dead:206b:70ff:fe45:7242, 2001:8b0:ca2c:dead::5e11  YES        
✓ root@pica» lxc-stop --name chagers; lxc-start --daemon --name chagers
✓ root@pica» lxc-ls --fancy | grep chagers
chagers   RUNNING  10.0.0.32  2001:8b0:ca2c:dead::5e11                                         YES        

That is not how computers are supposed to behave!damascus-unix-prompt

Oct 032015
 

One thing that has always puzzled me about Linux Containers was why it is necessary to configure the network address in two places – the container configuration, and the operating system configuration. The short answer is that it isn't.

If you configure network addresses statically within the container configuration :-

» grep net /var/lib/lxc/mango/config 
# networking
lxc.network.type = veth
lxc.network.flags = up
lxc.network.link = br0
lxc.network.ipv4 = 10.0.0.35/16
lxc.network.ipv4.gateway = 10.0.0.1
lxc.network.ipv6 =         2001:0db8:ca2c:dead:0000:0000:0000:000a/64
lxc.network.ipv6.gateway = 2001:0db8:ca2c:dead:0000:0000:0000:0001

Then the configuration within the container's operating system can simply be :-

» cat /var/lib/lxc/mango/rootfs/etc/network/interfaces
auto lo
iface lo inet loopback

auto eth0
iface eth0 inet manual
iface eth0 inet6 manual

And that works fine.

Oct 032015
 

One of the things that has been mildly irritating me about my little collection of Linux containers has been that in addition to the statically defined IPv6 addresses, there is also an automatically defined IPv6 address :-

» lxc-ls --fancy
NAME      STATE    IPV4       IPV6                                                              AUTOSTART  
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
apricot   RUNNING  10.0.0.34  2001:db8:ca2c:dead:21e:a0ff:feb6:6a, 2001:db8:ca2c:dead::3eb      YES        
chagers   RUNNING  10.0.0.32  2001:db8:ca2c:dead:804a:bfff:fe83:f98d, 2001:db8:ca2c:dead::5e11  YES        
glanders  RUNNING  10.0.0.31  2001:db8:ca2c:dead:21e:a0ff:feb6:66, 2001:db8:ca2c:dead::ba11     YES        
lyme      RUNNING  10.0.0.30  2001:db8:ca2c:dead:21e:a0ff:feb6:65, 2001:db8:ca2c:dead::cafe     YES        
mango     RUNNING  10.0.0.35  2001:db8:ca2c:dead:6c42:24ff:fe7d:4e9, 2001:db8:ca2c:dead::a      YES        
peach     RUNNING  10.0.0.33  2001:db8:ca2c:dead:21e:a0ff:feb6:68, 2001:db8:ca2c:dead::3a11     YES        
rhubarb   RUNNING  10.0.0.40  2001:db8:ca2c:dead:21e:a0ff:feb6:69, 2001:db8:ca2c:dead::dead     YES  

Now this is hardly the end of the world, but it is not tidy and it is the sort of thing that may lead to problems down the road if servers are communicating on an address that is not reverse DNS registered. Or indeed when someone contacts a server on an address such as 2001:db8:ca2c:dead::3eb and the reply comes from 2001:db8:ca2c:dead:21e:a0ff:feb6:6a.

After any number of false starts, the answer is quite simple – use sysctl to turn off autoconfigured address from within the container; which doesn't make much sense logically – containers don't have a kernel of their own, so the global kernel should be the one that is tuned. However :-

for container in $(lxc-ls)
do
  echo net.ipv6.conf.eth0.autoconf = 0 >> /var/lib/lxc/$container/rootfs/etc/sysctl.conf
done

Does the trick (after a reboot)  :-

» lxc-ls --fancy
NAME      STATE    IPV4       IPV6                                                              AUTOSTART  
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
apricot   RUNNING  10.0.0.34  2001:db8:ca2c:dead:21e:a0ff:feb6:6a, 2001:db8:ca2c:dead::3eb      YES        
chagers   RUNNING  10.0.0.32  2001:db8:ca2c:dead:18d9:99ff:fe28:3591, 2001:db8:ca2c:dead::5e11  YES        
glanders  RUNNING  10.0.0.31  2001:db8:ca2c:dead:21e:a0ff:feb6:66, 2001:db8:ca2c:dead::ba11     YES        
lyme      RUNNING  10.0.0.30  2001:db8:ca2c:dead::cafe                                          YES        
mango     RUNNING  10.0.0.35  2001:db8:ca2c:dead:2411:80ff:feb9:6600, 2001:db8:ca2c:dead::a     YES        
peach     RUNNING  10.0.0.33  2001:db8:ca2c:dead::3a11                                          YES        
rhubarb   RUNNING  10.0.0.40  2001:db8:ca2c:dead::dead                                          YES        

Except for the older containers 🙁 

I've obviously missed something, but fixing nearly half of the containers is a good start.

After attending to pending upgrades (some of my old containers were still running wheezy), and setting the network configuration to manual, one of the recalictrant containers (glanders) lost it's autoconfigured address. 

Two more containers lost their unwanted extra addresses after "fixing" their configuration. I'm not sure what was wrong with the old configuration, but after copying and modifying a recently created container configuration, they rebooted with just one IPv6 address. The last one was mango, but after an extra reboot, it also was fixed :-

» lxc-ls --fancy
NAME      STATE    IPV4       IPV6                      AUTOSTART  
-----------------------------------------------------------------
apricot   RUNNING  10.0.0.34  2001:db8:ca2c:dead::3eb   YES        
chagers   RUNNING  10.0.0.32  2001:db8:ca2c:dead::5e11  YES        
glanders  RUNNING  10.0.0.31  2001:db8:ca2c:dead::ba11  YES        
lyme      RUNNING  10.0.0.30  2001:db8:ca2c:dead::cafe  YES        
mango     RUNNING  10.0.0.35  2001:db8:ca2c:dead::a     YES        
peach     RUNNING  10.0.0.33  2001:db8:ca2c:dead::3a11  YES        
rhubarb   RUNNING  10.0.0.40  2001:db8:ca2c:dead::dead  YES        
May 222015
 

So on my upgrade from Wheezy to Jessie, I found myself (amongst other issues) looking at a graphical interface where the mouse worked fine, but no mouse pointer was visible. After trying a few other things, it turned out that :-

gsettings set org.gnome.settings-daemon.plugins.cursor active false

Did the trick.

Of course that tip came from somewhere else, but as it worked for me, it’s worth making a note of.

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