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May 042018
 

I had the pleasure of upgrading a server today which involved fixing a number of little niggles; one of which was that connecting to switches suddenly stopped working :-

✗ msm@${server}» ssh admin@${someswitch}
Unable to negotiate with ${ip} port 22: no matching key exchange method found. Their offer: diffie-hellman-group1-sha1

This was relatively easily fixed :-

✗ msm@${server}» ssh -o KexAlgorithms=+diffie-hellman-group1-sha1 admin@${someswitch}
Password: 

Of course doing this command-by-command is a little tedious, so a more permanent solution is to re-enable all the supported key exchange algorithms. The relevant algorithms can be listed with ssh -Q kex, and they can be listed in the server-wide client configuration in /etc/ssh/ssh_config :-

Host *
    KexAlgorithms ${comma-separated-list}

But Why?

According the OpenSSH developers, the latest version of ssh are refusing to use certain key exchange algorithms (and other cryptographic ‘functions’).

Their intention is perfectly reasonable – by default the software refuses to use known weak crypto. I’m fully behind the idea of discouraging the use of weak crypto.

But the effect of disabling weak crypto in the client is unfortunate – all of a sudden people are unable to connect to certain devices. The developers suggest that the best way of fixing the problem is to upgrade the server so that it supports strong cryptography.

I fully agree, but there are problems with that :-

  1. Some of the devices may very well be unsupported with no means to upgrade the ssh dæmon. Now in an ideal world, these devices wouldn’t be on the network, but in the real world there are such devices on the network.
  2. Some devices may not be capable of being upgraded because of processor or memory limitations. Network switches are notorious for having slow processors and tiny amounts of memory, and it is entirely possible that such a device would not be capable of running more exotic and modern crypto. Similarly lights out management processors are often severely limited.
  3. Even if a device is capable of being upgraded, there are the standard problems – the vendor may be slow at releasing updates, change control gets in the way, and lastly resourcing may be an issue – upgrading several hundred switches manually with just one or two people doing it is not going to be a quick job.

Lastly, whilst security is important, breaking things just to make a point is a little extreme. Whilst it is possible to fix the problem, it is something that isn’t immediately obvious to someone who doesn’t routinely configure ssh. And someone, somewhere has had this breakage occur just before they really need to fiddle with a switch Right Now.

There is a far better option available – leave the weak crypto enabled, but warn noisily about its use :-

WARNING!!!!! (2 second delay)
WARNING!!!!! (2 second delay)

The device you are connecting to only supports known weak crypto which means this connection
is subject to interception by an attacker.

You should look at upgrading the device as soon as possible.

Telling people what is wrong noisily and continuing to work is far better than simply breaking with a rather terse message.

Foggy Reflection

 

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